A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

If you ever get a chance, talk to the Secretary of your Odd Fellows Lodge and ask to look at the Member Register. This is the document that provides information on all members of your Lodge from the date of institution of the Lodge till the present. It’s really a fascinating historical document, and I think you will enjoy the interlude in your Lodge’s past. (Most registers are very old, so make sure to handle them with care – clean white gloves are recommended to protect the ancient pages.)

A Fascinating Discovery About Odd Fellows

But the purpose of this newsletter is more limited. I’ve thumbed through a number of Member Registers from different Lodges during my time as the Grand Master of California, and here’s a fascinating fact that I discovered: If you look at the register from a Century or more ago, you will find the vast majority of members initiated into the Lodge were in their 20’s, 30’s and 40’s. And if you compare that to members initiated into the Lodge over the past decade, you will find the vast majority of members initiated into the Lodge fall into the age range of their 50’s, 60’s and 70’s.

Why do you suppose that is?

Well, no one knows for sure, but I have a pretty good theory. You see, 100 or 150 years ago, Odd Fellowship was new and fresh in North America. Fraternal Orders in general were popular as gathering places for social, community and fraternal activities. Odd Fellowship, in particular, offered young men (and eventually young women) an opportunity to gather, meet and mingle. There was no television or Internet, of course. It was fun and exciting to start a new Lodge, build a building, and grow a fraternity. Over the decades, however, the shine has worn away. Members became comfortable and complacent. The newness was gone. The edge was no longer there. Members settled into a familiar routine – the status quo was the norm.

And the reality is that when we bring in new members to our Odd Fellows Lodges, we tend to bring in people that we know, in the same general age range as ourselves. So, a Century ago, the 30-year-old members tended to bring in other 30-year-old members. Today, there are precious few 30-year-old members in our Lodges. But there are a lot of 60-year-old members. And those 60-year-old members tend to bring in other 60-year-old members.

Obviously, this is a self-defeating prophesy. This can’t continue.

What is the Solution

The solution is apparent. To survive and flourish, our Lodges need to bring in new members in their 20’s, 30’s and 40’s. Those Lodges that have skipped a generation of members (and there are a lot of those Lodges) must focus on recovering that lost generation.

Not an easy proposition, however. Why would a Lodge composed of members in their 60’s, 70’s and 80’s be of any interest to a young person in his/her 20’s, 30’s and 40’s?

In future DMC Newsletters we will explore this vital existential question. And we invite other Lodges – which have found solutions to the challenge of bringing in younger members – to write with your success stories.

F – L – T

Dave Rosenberg
Past Grand Master
Jurisdiction of California
Independent Order of Odd Fellows

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

If you ever get a chance, talk to the Secretary of your Odd Fellows Lodge and ask to look at the Member Register. This is the document that provides information on all members of your Lodge from the date of institution of the Lodge till the present. It's really a...

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

Updated: [DATE]​Dear Dedicated Members for Change, One of the very first things we learn when we join Odd Fellowship is the ancient "commands" of this Order, instructing members to "visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan." I must...

What do you see in this photograph?

What do you see in this photograph?

Updated: September 6, 2021What do you see in this photograph? If you said "a group of Odd Fellows" you were absolutely correct. The three links symbol on the chair in the foreground and the banners in the background indicate that you are in a Lodge of Odd Fellows. And...

More Information about the Independent Order of Odd Fellows

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

Updated: [DATE]

​Dear Dedicated Members for Change,

One of the very first things we learn when we join Odd Fellowship is the ancient “commands” of this Order, instructing members to “visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan.”

I must be slacking because I haven’t been visiting the sick, relieving the distressed, burying the dead, nor educating the orphan lately.

Have you?

My point, however, is that these ancient commands, for the most part are . . . well . . . ancient. You might as well command us to draw water from the well, milk the cows at dawn, hand-make our own clothing, and participate in a barn raising.

Don’t get me wrong. Historically, the four commands made absolute good sense. There was a time when there were no social services or government assistance provided to the public. Odd Fellows stepped into the breach two centuries ago to build hospitals, construct homes for widows and widowers, establish cemeteries, and operate orphanages. Odd Fellows filled a great historical need and at a time when Odd Fellowship boasted almost one million members, the country was dotted with Odd Fellows’ cemeteries, hospitals, homes for the aging, and orphanages. Today, when our fraternal membership has shrunk to a mere fraction of our former numbers, there is far less ability to own and operate cemeteries, hospitals, retirement homes and orphanages, and there is far less need for Odd Fellows to do any of that in the 21st Century.

Some of the old admonitions can and should still be applicable today. It is a good thing for Odd Fellows to continue to help other Odd Fellows who may be sick or distressed. But as to burying the dead, maybe not so much. To prospective members of our Lodges, the admonition to “bury the dead” just sounds ghoulish. And educate the orphan? When was the last time you ran into an “orphan” or “orphanage” in the United States? The concept of “orphanage” is a relic from another century.

If we wish to remain relevant to the men and women coming up in this new century, we need to adapt to fit the times. After all, it is these 21st Century men and women that we are seeking as new members in our Lodges, to join, sustain, refresh and continue our fraternity.

So, what resonates with the young adults in 2021?

Surely “bury the dead” and “educate the orphan” don’t. But how about “protect the environment” and “help children in need”? I submit that these latter two new commands should replace the outmoded ones and will give us new direction in a new era. Men and women of the 21st Century are vitally concerned with the health and well-being of our planet – our atmosphere, our climate, our land, our waters, our flora and fauna. They want to do their part to protect the Earth for themselves, and for their children and grandchildren. And frankly, so do men and women born in the last century. It is an enduring theme that connects us all – whether we are 20 or 80 years of age. And “help children in need” is an appropriate evolution from “educate the orphan”. While there are precious few orphans in our country today, there are certainly children caught up in the court system, children who are in foster care or aging out of the foster system, children who are hungry and unhoused. The list of children in need is, unfortunately, extensive – and there is plenty for Odd Fellows to do in this arena at the Lodge level.

So the revised commands would instruct us to “visit the sick, relieve the distress, protect the environment, and help children in need.” It would become a link to our past and a bridge to our future.

F – L – T

Dave Rosenberg
Past Grand Master
Jurisdiction of California

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

If you ever get a chance, talk to the Secretary of your Odd Fellows Lodge and ask to look at the Member Register. This is the document that provides information on all members of your Lodge from the date of institution of the Lodge till the present. It's really a...

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

Updated: [DATE]​Dear Dedicated Members for Change, One of the very first things we learn when we join Odd Fellowship is the ancient "commands" of this Order, instructing members to "visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan." I must...

What do you see in this photograph?

What do you see in this photograph?

Updated: September 6, 2021What do you see in this photograph? If you said "a group of Odd Fellows" you were absolutely correct. The three links symbol on the chair in the foreground and the banners in the background indicate that you are in a Lodge of Odd Fellows. And...

More Information about the Independent Order of Odd Fellows

It is time for change to the Odd Fellows degrees and archaic methods

It is time for change to the Odd Fellows degrees and archaic methods

Updated: August 2, 2021

It’s time the Independent Order of Odd Fellows revamp its degrees to fit society’s pace, which is efficient and to-the-point. The early American Odd Fellows understood this concept of making adjustments. Each time it was a challenge, but, each time the members were smart enough to know adjustments had to be made.

In the 1820’s the Odd Fellows established their unique work. In later years, in the 1840’s they made sure they eliminated any and all aspects of the Masonic mentions in their degrees; after all the Masons and Odd Fellows are not the same. Neither is better than the other or worse. One has been less likely to change but, both have declined in membership.

In 1835, the first improvements were made to the degrees. In 1845, the second set of improvements were made to the ritual. Down to the words in a single sentence, all were scrutinized. In that same year, the signs used in the unwritten work were also changed. Even two new signs were added for the degree of Rebekah, being the hailing sign (originally called the Hailing or Sea sign) and sign of recognition. In 1851, the degree of Rebekah, drafted by Schuyler Colfax, “was intended as an honorary degree for Scarlet members and their wives.”

The degrees and rituals continued to be adjusted over the years. More changes have occurred than the membership realize. What we have today is definitely profound and definitely biblically derived and should be retained in essence; however, changes are needed. This, of course, is easier said than done.

Changes to the degrees continued on a regular basis; each time such change proposals were never easily accepted, but they were made regardless. Degrees have been combined, passages have been removed and added. As some codes had been changed, the ritual and the degrees have been altered, too. Newer or those members who are unaware changes are a regular occurrence in the Odd Fellows, should realize these changes are a normal to the Order.

The beginning of the Sovereign Grand Lodge’s (SGL) Five-Year Plan has effectively begun. With the Ladies Auxiliary Patriarchs Militant falling by the side, the plan has started. Next, the Encampments face elimination; this could be voted upon this August. It was going to be presented and voted upon in 2019, but it was decided to wait and re-discuss the terms of the Five-Year Plan and then vote.

As you can see, we are facing the loss of certain relished degree work and those principles that come with those degrees of all branches.

As our various grand bodies face elimination with the recent proposals by SGL and the societal evolutions effect the necessity of such fraternal groups, and the overall decline in membership, we must put our collective minds together and present sensible alternatives and improvements desirable for the majority of members.

One suggestion stands out more than any other, which has gained a level of positive feedback and could make the Order more attractive to potential applicants. It suggests merging all of the entities of Odd Fellowship (LAPM, LEA, PM, Encampment, Jr. Theta Rho, Rebekah) into the Odd Fellows Lodge and implementing all of the degrees of these entities into the Odd Fellows Lodge. Then, a member, after attaining the Initiatory Degree, would be permitted to choose whatever degree experience that member wishes. Such member could choose to go further in the Odd Fellows, while attaining necessary degrees, and then further choose to receive the other degrees within the lodge – all and any degrees from one single Odd Fellows lodge. With this design, none of the degree work would be lost forever, as inevitably those other grand bodies will cease.

This would lead into a more attractive one-dues payment to a lodge as well. This would prevent a member who already belongs to these different groups from having to pay a small fortune to belong to every group. It would streamline a great deal of paperwork and multiple dues cards, etc.

F – L – T

Peter Sellars
Past Grand Master, Independent Order of Odd Fellows
Jurisdiction of California

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

If you ever get a chance, talk to the Secretary of your Odd Fellows Lodge and ask to look at the Member Register. This is the document that provides information on all members of your Lodge from the date of institution of the Lodge till the present. It's really a...

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

Updated: [DATE]​Dear Dedicated Members for Change, One of the very first things we learn when we join Odd Fellowship is the ancient "commands" of this Order, instructing members to "visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan." I must...

What do you see in this photograph?

What do you see in this photograph?

Updated: September 6, 2021What do you see in this photograph? If you said "a group of Odd Fellows" you were absolutely correct. The three links symbol on the chair in the foreground and the banners in the background indicate that you are in a Lodge of Odd Fellows. And...

More Information about the Independent Order of Odd Fellows

Laughter is not against the Code of the Odd Fellows

Laughter is not against the Code of the Odd Fellows

Updated: July 26, 2021

​News Flash – Laughter is Not Against the Code…

It’s a real oddity, the fact that the Independent Order of Odd Fellows may take themselves a bit too seriously. The name alone should signal congeniality. Other groups, such as E. Clampus Vitus (“The Clampers” – 10 times bigger than us), The Shriners (look at their funny hats and tiny scooters in parades – 7 times bigger than us), the Freemasons (41 times bigger than us, like to still display a vast array of mysterious symbols).

Why would it be, then, that our group, the smallest of these four, insists upon taking things more seriously than other groups much larger? And how does taking things too seriously attract new members?

Anyone who has served as a statewide appointive or elective officer has encountered many lodges in their journeys. Those of us lucky enough to have done so certainly have encountered a varied selection of members, meetings, and Odd Fellow events.

What surprised me in my own journeys was the almost stupefying belligerence, and outward critical nature some members seem to have. Of course, there are many wonderful members, always congenial, outgoing, and happy to see new faces. But there are some who seem to resent anyone and sometimes everyone.

If we are serious about wanting to encourage growth, we need to lose this type of outward resentment many of us have. Clearly, there are a myriad of reasons for resentment in life, but really there should be no logical reason for resentment in lodge. And yet, it seems like at almost every IOOF event and lodge there is someone really upset about something. We need to give serious thought about how best to approach our fellow members without causing friction. A few pointers might help.

  1. Our individual mandate is not to police the order. Too many times, I have seen people belittle others because perhaps one party is poorer than the other, or they feel they are less fitting to be a member. But this is not the case, and it is not our job to get rid of people, or even to pass judgment. Friendship, Love, and Truth, remember?
  2. Lodges often become hotbeds of gossip. But this does nothing but cause animosity among those attending. Nothing constructive comes from animosity.
  3. Longstanding members tend to air grievances publicly, and talk about their take on our code, rituals, and by-laws as if they are the only ones able to interpret them. These documents are merely guidelines and not meant as bludgeons with which to wield punishment.
  4. Nothing really is required of a member. Many members like to guilt trip other members into attending events, often because otherwise the events may be ill-attended. We are all volunteers in a fraternal group. We should seek nothing but our own happiness. If something we do seems like just a boring chore, eventually we will stop doing it. It is inevitable.
  5. Have fun. That should seem like a no-brainer, but many of us have forgotten how to do so. If you are unhappy within your lodge, ask yourself what would make you happy? Others may be happy to join you in whatever idea you may have.
  6. Young people have new ideas. This does not mean that the young are crazy. Being elderly does not make us better. All members should be treated equally.
  7. Try something new. Just because an event has been held since the landing of the Mayflower does not mean that it should continue ad infinitum. If attendance is waning, perhaps it’s time for a new event.

Shake things up but be happy. There is no need for unhappiness in a lodge. If you are unhappy, help make changes. This order can survive if we just remember that we are here mainly for our own enjoyment.

In Friendship, Love, and Truth, Rick Boyles

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

If you ever get a chance, talk to the Secretary of your Odd Fellows Lodge and ask to look at the Member Register. This is the document that provides information on all members of your Lodge from the date of institution of the Lodge till the present. It's really a...

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

Updated: [DATE]​Dear Dedicated Members for Change, One of the very first things we learn when we join Odd Fellowship is the ancient "commands" of this Order, instructing members to "visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan." I must...

What do you see in this photograph?

What do you see in this photograph?

Updated: September 6, 2021What do you see in this photograph? If you said "a group of Odd Fellows" you were absolutely correct. The three links symbol on the chair in the foreground and the banners in the background indicate that you are in a Lodge of Odd Fellows. And...

Anatomy of a Healthy Odd Fellows Lodge

Anatomy of a Healthy Odd Fellows Lodge

Updated: July 22, 2021

Today’s DMC Newsletter could be entitled “Anatomy of a Healthy Odd Fellows Lodge.”

I’m going to talk about the Lodge that I know far better than any other Lodge – my own Lodge: Davis Lodge #169 in Davis, California. I believe that I can rightfully say we are a “healthy” Lodge. We have over 320 members, making us the largest Odd Fellows Lodge in California in terms of number of members – and to my knowledge, we may very well be the largest Lodge in North America, and perhaps the world. But, of course, the quantity of our membership alone doesn’t make for a healthy Lodge – but the quality of our membership experience is strong and vibrant.

It wasn’t always that way. When I first joined the Davis Lodge in 2004, we had less than 30 members on the books of the Lodge – similar to the vast majority of Lodges in this jurisdiction and elsewhere. And the Lodge in 2004 didn’t really do much for the members or for the community. How in the world did we increase our membership over ten-fold in that time period? The answer is that we followed a methodology that I first laid out for the Lodge when I became Noble Grand of the Davis Lodge in 2005. It has resulted in a net gain in our membership every single year since 2005 and a healthy, enthusiastic and thriving Lodge for our community. Perhaps we’ll call it “the Davis Method” – but whatever you call it, it works. Other Lodges in California have tried it to great success. Here, simplified, are the three components that have enabled us to be healthy:

1. Focus on Membership. Human beings can live for 100 years. Fraternal Orders can live for centuries. But the only way that a Lodge can be sustained beyond the current generation is to focus on membership and to bring in members of all ages, races, genders, and socioeconomic categories. Bringing in new members is vital if a Lodge (or a fraternal order) is to survive beyond the current generation.

Too many Lodges have simply failed to keep pace. And the membership just gets older and older. A Lodge is in trouble where the average age of members is 70 or more.

Recently, I asked our Lodge’s Financial Secretary Raleigh Klein to give me a breakdown of the ages of our 322 members. Most of the current leaders of the Lodge are in their 60’s and 70’s. The results showed that the average age of our Lodge membership is 59. Drilling down, we found that 79 of our members were in their 50’s – that’s significant because that’s the next generation of leadership for our Lodge. Drilling down even further, we found that 67 of our members were in their 40’s, 30’s, 20’s or teens – that’s perhaps even more significant because that’s the upcoming generation of leadership.

Our Lodge is healthy because we represent the spectrum of ages.

It’s important to have a strong Membership Committee, but frankly, membership is the responsibility of each and every member of the Lodge. And we don’t make it easy for our applicants for membership. We call the applicants “Pledges” and we require that they go through a process of reading about the Order and our Lodge, taking a test, attending events at the Lodge, and interviewing members of the Lodge. Through the process they are initiated with much more knowledge of who we are, and they are enthusiastic about membership.

2. Focus on Committees. No one wants to join a boring Lodge. Lodges need to be active to attract and to maintain membership. The Davis Lodge displays good health in this area because we have 57 Lodge Committees. Our committees run the gamut of administrative committees (such as the Visiting Committee, Bylaws Committee, Finance Committee, and the like), Lodge social committees (such as our weekly Club Night Committee, the OddtoberFest Committee, the Hiking Committee, the Cigar Lounge Committee, the Knitting Committee, and the like), and community-serving committees (such as Breakfast with Santa, Thursday Live! music at the Lodge, Classic Film Festival Committee, the Davis Chocolate Festival Committee, and the like).

Our Lodge has very high visibility in the community and because of that. potential members come to us to explore joining the Lodge.

In our Lodge, when members come to leadership with ideas for new endeavors, we don’t automatically say “no” – we explore the idea and in virtually every cases, we wind up saying “yes” – we form a committee, get volunteers and make it happen. Most of our committees started with an idea. Recently, for example, it was suggested that we form a “Zombie Bike Ride” committee. We did it, and it was a resounding success. At Halloween, we had over 1,000 Lodge and community members (including families) on their bicycles, in costumes, dressed like zombies. We also raised funds and paid for six specially built tricycles for disabled children that we donated to families. A few days ago, one of our members (who is a teacher and sketch artist) suggested that we host a “self-portrait art show”. There was a lot of enthusiasm for this simple project and it’s off and running. And what a great idea to get “reacquainted” after the pandemic lock-down and social distancing.

3. Focus on the Social Aspects. Lodges must follow the ritual – we are. after all, a fraternal order. But Lodges that only have formal meetings where members sit around in a darkened room reading from a little red book, are one dimensional Lodges. Of course, we have to have a formal meeting once a month with full ritual and regalia. But it’s OK to have social meetings, and it’s OK to open the doors and windows of the Lodge to the community, and it’s OK to have social events for the members, members’ families, and the community at large. Don’t forget – when Odd Fellowship first started centuries ago, the members gathered in pubs to enjoy each other’s company, drink and eat, tell stories and just have a good time. Let’s not forget the social aspect of our fraternal life.

In the Davis Lodge (when we’re not locked down in a pandemic), there is something happening at the Lodge most days of every month. For example, we have a weekly “Club Night at the Lodge” which is an informal social gathering of members and applicants. The bar is open, dinner is available, and we play trivia with a trivia master. One of our members plays a baby grand piano in the background and the big-screen television is on with sporting events. It’s a regular feature every Thursday evening and typically 50 folks stop by to enjoy the social time. Other activities include monthly Bingo for the members and community, monthly music venues for members and the community, and a monthly Saturday morning breakfast meeting, among other gatherings.

All in all, the Davis Lodge is alive, well and healthy. I mention all this because there may be some kernels of truth which may be of benefit to your Lodge.

F – L – T

Dave Rosenberg
Past Grand Master
Jurisdiction of California
Independent Order of Odd Fellows

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

If you ever get a chance, talk to the Secretary of your Odd Fellows Lodge and ask to look at the Member Register. This is the document that provides information on all members of your Lodge from the date of institution of the Lodge till the present. It's really a...

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

Updated: [DATE]​Dear Dedicated Members for Change, One of the very first things we learn when we join Odd Fellowship is the ancient "commands" of this Order, instructing members to "visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan." I must...

What do you see in this photograph?

What do you see in this photograph?

Updated: September 6, 2021What do you see in this photograph? If you said "a group of Odd Fellows" you were absolutely correct. The three links symbol on the chair in the foreground and the banners in the background indicate that you are in a Lodge of Odd Fellows. And...

Necessary adjustments in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of California

Necessary adjustments in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of California

Updated: July 2, 2021

Peter Sellars is a long-time leader of this Order. He is a Past Grand Master of the Jurisdiction of California, and a current member of the Grand Lodge Board of Directors of California, as well as one of our two elected Grand Lodge Representatives to the Sovereign Grand Lodge. He is a leader of the Lodges in San Francisco, and is well-recognized in the Bay Area and the State for his in-depth knowledge of IOOF, the rules and the ritual. He has written several excellent books about Odd Fellowship. He is a founding member of “Dedicated Members for Change.”

In short, Brother Peter has been around the Odd Fellows’ block. In this article, he presents a viewpoint that will help this Order survive and flourish into the next century.

F – L – T

Dave Rosenberg
Past Grand Master
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Jurisdiction of California

By Peter Sellars, Past Grand Master

California leads the way for progressive Odd Fellowship! We look at the numbers and must investigate the reason behind this larger jurisdiction. Surely, it has to do with the more liberal interpretation of our codes and rituals.

Too many jurisdictions live by the strict rule and letter of the law per se. We find those strict jurisdictions struggling to entice new applicants and in keeping the members they have found. Too many of these other jurisdictions don’t incorporate the ideas and suggestions of their newer members, so that adjustments can be made to help the Order fit the community in which it resides. This doesn’t mean changing everything we know as our traditions. It means adjusting events to fit the community around us, so we – as an organization – fit in. This concept seems rather difficult for some members to accept.

We know that most jurisdictions based on geographical locations across the country and around the world whose demographics are different than California, won’t need to adjust.

However, In many of our larger and more fluid and more diverse areas, we have made adjustments and continue to blend with our populace. We find what is effective within our ritual and code to make it work.

Continual applicants are sought as we seek to maintain our existence. There has been a steep decline for too long and we must share the methods of acceptance we use in California with other jurisdictions. For example, using one demographic, in San Francisco we participate in all of our city’s parades. We walk and display our banner in the Pride Parade, Chinese New Year Parade, St. Patrick’s Day Parade, Pistahan (Filipino) Parade, etc. Because our membership is made up of all these peoples, we embrace each celebration. We fit in our particular community.

Biases and racist attitudes had hurt this Order for a long time, including California. We seem to be making acceptance regular and it has benefited several lodges.

The state leadership has also embraced this improvements to the Order and are aware of the need to reach out to everyone in our ever-changing world. We now seek to expand our successes to other jurisdictions.

We must spread the word and be universal in practicing Friendship, Love, and Truth. We must truly embrace each other as brothers and sisters!

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

A peek into the Odd Fellows member register

If you ever get a chance, talk to the Secretary of your Odd Fellows Lodge and ask to look at the Member Register. This is the document that provides information on all members of your Lodge from the date of institution of the Lodge till the present. It's really a...

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

What do we learn as Odd Fellows?

Updated: [DATE]​Dear Dedicated Members for Change, One of the very first things we learn when we join Odd Fellowship is the ancient "commands" of this Order, instructing members to "visit the sick, relieve the distressed, bury the dead, and educate the orphan." I must...

What do you see in this photograph?

What do you see in this photograph?

Updated: September 6, 2021What do you see in this photograph? If you said "a group of Odd Fellows" you were absolutely correct. The three links symbol on the chair in the foreground and the banners in the background indicate that you are in a Lodge of Odd Fellows. And...

More Information about the Independent Order of Odd Fellows

Pin It on Pinterest